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In old English and Scotch law. Respite; delay; continuance of time; postponement Respiciendum est judieanti ne quid aut durius aut rewissius coustituatur quam causa deposcit; nee euim aut se- vcritatis aut demcntise gloria aii’ecta.uda est. The judge must see that no order be made or judgment given or sentence passed either more harshly or more mildly thau the case requires; he must not seek renown, either as a severe or as a tender-hearted judge.

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E CONTRA

From the opposite; on the contrary.

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E CONVERSO

Conversely. On the other hand; on the contrary. Equivalent to e contra.

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E G

An abbreviation of exempli gratia. For the sake of an example.

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E MERA GRATIA

Out of mere grace or favor.

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E PLURIBUS UNUM

a Latin phrase that is the motto of the USA and states: Out of many, one or more commonly One for all and all for one.

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EA

Sax. The water or river; also the mouth of a river on the shore between highand low water-mark.Ea est accipienda interpretatio, quae vitio caret. That interpretation is to be received[or adopted] which is free from fault [or wrong.] The law will not Intend a wrong. Bac.Max. 17, (in reg. 3.)

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EA INTENTIONE

With that intent. Held not to make a condition, but a confidence and trust. Dyer, 13S6.Ea quae, commendandi causa, in ven- ditionibus dicuntur, si palam appareant,venditorem non obligant. Those things which are said on sales, in the way of commendation,if [the qualities of the thing sold] appear openly, do not bind the seller. Dig. 18, 1, 43, pr.Ea quae dari impossibilia sunt, vel quae in rerum natura non sunt, pro non ad- jet tisbabentur. Those things which are impossible to be given, or which are not in the natureof things, are regarded as not added, [as no part of an agreement.] Dig. 50, 17, 135.Ea quae in cnria nostra rite acta sunt debitae execntioni demandari debent. Co.Litt. 2S9. Those things which are properly transacted in our court ought to be committed to a due execution.Ea quae raro accidunt non temere In agendis negotiis computantur. Those thingswhich rarely happen are not to be taken into account in the transaction of business,without suffieieut reason. Dig. 50, 17, 64.

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EACH

A distributive adjective pronoun, which denotes or refers to every one of thepersons or things mentioned; every one of two or more persons or things, composingthe whole, separately considered. The effect of this word, used in the covenants of a’bond, is to create a several obligation. Seller v. State, 160 Ind. 605, 67 N. E. 448;Knickerbocker v. People, 102 111. 233; Costi- gan v. Lunt, 104 Mass. 219.Eadem causa diversis rationibns coram judicibus ecclesiasticis et aeculari- busventilatur. 2 Inst. 622. The same cause is argued upon different principles beforeecclesiastical and secular judges.Eadem est ratio, eadem est lex. Thesame reason, the same law. Charles River Bridge v. Warren Bridge, 7 Pick. (Mass.) 493.Eadem mens praesnmitur regis quae est juris et quae esse debet, praesertim indubiis. Hob. 154. The mind of the sovereign is presumed to be coincident with that ofthe law, and with that which it ought to be, especially in ambiguous matters.

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EAGLE

A gold coin of the United States of the value of ten dollars.

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EALDER, or EALDING

In old Saxon law. An elder or chief.

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EALDERMAN, or EALDORMAN

The name of a Saxon magistrate; alderman; analogous to carl among the Danes, and senatoramong the Romans. See ALDERMAN.

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EALDOR-BISCOP

An archbishop.

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EALDORBURG

Sax. The metropolis; the chief city. Obsolete.

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EALEHUS

(Fr. ealc. Sax., ale, and hus, house.) An ale-house.

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EALHORDA

Sax. The privilege of assisiug and selling beer. Obsolete.

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EAR GRASS

In English law. Such grass which is upon the land after the mowing, until the feast of the Annunciation after. 3 Leon. 213.

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EAR-MARK

A mark put ui>on a thing to distinguish It from another. Originally andliterally, a mark upon the ear; a mode of marking sheep and other animals.Property is said to be ear-marked when it can be identified or distinguished fromother property of the same nature.Money has no ear-mark, but It is an ordinary term for a privy mark made by any one on a coin.

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EAR-WITNESS

In the law of evidence. One who attests or can attest anything asheard ‘by himself.

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EARL

A title of nobility, formerly the highest in England, now the third, rankingbetween a marquis and a viscount, and corresponding with the French “comte” and theGerman “graf.” The title originated with the Saxons, and is the most ancient of theEnglish peerage. William the Conqueror first made this title hereditary, giving it in fee tohis nobles; and alloting them for the support of their state the third penny out of thesheriff’s court, issuing out of all pleas of the shire, whence they had their ancient title”shiremen.” At present the title is accompanied by no territory, private or judicial rights,but merely confers nobility and an hereditary seat in the house of lords. Wharton.

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