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DYING WITHOUT ISSUE

At .common law this phrase imports an indefinite failure ofissue, and not a dying without issue surviving at the time of the death of the first taker.But this rule has been changed in some of the states, by statute or decisions, and InEngland by St. 7 Wm. IV., and 1 Vict c. 26,

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DYKE-REED, or DYKE-REEVE

An officer who has the care and oversight of the dykes and drains in fenny counties.

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DYSNOMY

Bad legislation; the enactment of bad laws.

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DYSPAREUNIA

In medical jurisprudence. Incapacity of a woman to sustain the act of sexual intercourse except with great difficulty and pain.

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DYSPESIA

.A state of the stomach In which its functions are disturbed, without thepresence of other diseases, or when, if other diseases are present, they are of minorimportance. Dungl. Med. Diet

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DYVOUR

In Scotch law. A bankrupt.

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DYVOUR'S HABIT

In Scotch law. A habit which debtors who are set free on a ccssiobonorum are obliged to wear, unless in the summons and process of ccssio it be libeled,PUB tained, and proved that the bankruptcy proeieds from misfortune. And bankruptsare condemned to submit to the habit, even where no suspicion of fraud lies againstthem, if they have been dealers in an illicit trade. Ersk. Prin. 4, 3, 13.

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What is a Deposition?

Written by Christi Hayes and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



An essential element of any civil or criminal court action is the evidence offered by the parties. Evidence is what each side in a dispute must present to either a judge or a jury to prove what are, up to that point, probably nothing more than unproven allegations. Much of the evidence presented at a […]

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