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C

The initial letter of the word "Codex," used by some writers in citing the Code of Justiniau. Tayl. Civil Law, 24. It was also the letter iuscribed on the ballots by which, among the Romans, jurors voted to condemn an accused party. It was the initial letter of condcmno, I condemn. Tayl. Civil Law, 192. C, as the third letter of the alphabet, is used as a numeral, in like manner with that use of A and B, (q. v.) The letter is also used to designate the third of a series of propositions, sections, etc., as A, B, and the others are used as numerals. It is used as an abbreviation of many words of which it is the initial letter; such as cases, civil, circuit, code, common, court, criminal, chancellor, crown.

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C

C is a C-like programming language. Its creators, functional programming researchers Simon Peyton Jones and Norman Ramsey, designed it to be generated mainly by compilers for very high-level languages rather than written by human programmers.

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C A V

An abbreviation for curia ad- visari vult, the court will be advised, will consider, will deliberate.

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C B

In reports and legal documents, an abbreviation for common bench. Also an abbreviation for chief baron.

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C C

Various terms or phrases may be denoted by this abbreviation ; such as circuit court, (or city or county court;) criminal cases, (or crown or civil or chancery cases;) civil code; chief commissioner: and the return of cepi corpus.

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C C P

An abbreviation for Code of Civil Procedure; also for court of common pleas.

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C CORPORATION (C CORP)

A corporation in the United States that, for Federal income tax purposes, is taxed under and Subchapter C ( et seq.) of Chapter 1 of the Internal Revenue Code.A C corporation may also be subject to a separate Federal income tax called the Alternative Minimum Tax.

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C J

An abbreviation for chief justice; also for circuit judge.

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C L P

Common law procedure, in reference to the English acts so entitled.

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C O D

"Collect on delivery." These letters are not cabalistic, but have a determinate meaning. They import the carrier's liability to return to the consignor either the goods or the charges. U. S. Exp. Co. v. Keef- er, 59 Ind. 207; Fleming v. Com., 130 Pa. 138, 18 Atl. G22; Express Co. v. Wolf, 79 IU. 134.

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C P

An abbreviation for common pleas.

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C R

An abbreviation for curia regis; also for chancery reports.

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C T A

An abbreviation for cum testa- mento annexo, in describing a species of administration.

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C, CT, CTS

These abbreviations stand for "cent" or "cents," and any of them, placed at the top or head of a column of figures, sufficiently indicates the denomination of the figures below. Jackson v. Cummings, 15 111. 453; Hunt v. Smith, 9 Kan. 137; Linck v. Litchfield, 141 111. 409, 31 N. E. 123.

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C-SHARE

An Investment Trust being a corporate legal entity, may issue C shares (or

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CA;TERIS PARIBNS

Other things being equal.

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CABAL

A small association for the purpose of intrigue; an intrigue. This name was given to that ministry in the reign of Charles II. formed by Clifford, Ashley, Buckingham, Arlington, and Lauderdale, who concerted a scheme for the restoration of popery. The initials of these five names form the word "cabal;" hence the appellation. Hume, Hist. Eng. ix. 09.

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CABALIST

In French commercial law. A factor or broker.

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CABALLARIA

Pertaining to a horse. It was a feudal tenure of lands, the tenant furnishing a horseman suitably equipped in time of war, or when the lord had occasion for his service.

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CABALLERIA

In Spanish law. An allotment of land acquired by conquest, to a horse soldier. It was a strip one hundred feet wide by two hundred feet deep. The term has been sometimes used in those parts of the United States which were derived from Spain. See 12 Pet. 444, note.

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