Articles Archive

Will My Parents Bankruptcy Affect My Brother Getting Loans for College?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If your parents recently filed for bankruptcy, you'll notice some gradual changes in your living situation. Without usable credit cards or even much excess cash, your parents will have to cut back on their spending and shrink their financial footprint dramatically. You may be asked to make serious sacrifices: Many teenagers and young adults in […]

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Will My Rates Go Up If I Fix Car Damage from a Freeway Road Hazard Using Insurance?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



In insurance-industry parlance, "road hazards" can describe any number of objects that are foreign to the surface of a road. In the broadest sense, a road hazard is any object or substance that isn't asphalt, road paint or an authorized moving vehicle. Common types of weather-related road hazards include ice, snow and standing water. Common […]

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Will My Student Loan Refund Affect My Food Stamps and My Daughter's Medical Card?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



Most state welfare agencies maintain strict eligibility requirements for their participants. If you're currently receiving food stamps, medical assistance or other types of direct aid from your state's government, you may have to demonstrate that your annual income and assets fall below certain thresholds. If you earn too much money or have too many liquid […]

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Will Progressive Auto Insurance Raise Your Rates for No Reason?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If you're a Progressive Auto Insurance customer, you've probably wondered about your provider's pricing policies. Your curiosity isn't misplaced: Auto insurance pricing is an opaque, confusing and often frustrating practice. This is primarily due to the industry's competitiveness. Since the actuarial equations that determine auto insurance prices may vary slightly between providers, they're often treated […]

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Will Social Security Disability benefits be considered income in a bankruptcy plan?

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



The short answer is yes. The not so short answer is that while SSD may be considered income in a bankruptcy filing, it may not be a consideration for funds available in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy payment plan. SSD income may be viewed as part of disposable income to pay creditors depending on the state […]

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Wisdom - Stopping Paying Bills before Filing for Bankruptcy

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



When a person is very far down on his or her luck and that person’s financial situation is sufficiently bad for that person to consider bankruptcy and stopping any effort to try and pay bills, that person needs to consult a bankruptcy lawyer.  Street advice and experienced people and experts alike all say essentially the […]

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With Respect to Stocks and Mutual Funds, What Is the Difference Between Small Cap and Large Cap Investments?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If you're new to the world of investing, you'll eventually need to familiarize yourself with dozens of strange-sounding terms. If you have a full-time job and simply wish to grow some of your savings in preparation for your eventual retirement, you might find this task to be time-consuming and difficult. After all, many financial professionals […]

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Would I Need a Motorcycle License and Insurance to Drive a Vespa?

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



Also known as "mopeds," motorized scooters are becoming increasingly popular in the United States. In addition to being fun to drive and affordable to purchase, these vehicles are extremely fuel-efficient. Depending upon the model that you purchase, your new moped might be able to travel 75 miles on a single tank of fuel. Some newer […]

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Writing a 30-day notice of intent to vacate to your landlord

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If you are renting, check your lease to determine how long before you vacate your premises, you will be required to give your notice. This might be at least 30 days. This 30-day notice of intent to vacate to your landlord gives the management time to find new residents and schedule painting, cleaning and maintenance. […]

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Writing a Contract Addendum

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



A contract addendum is an agreed-upon addition signed by all parties to the original contract. It details the specific terms, clauses, sections and definitions to be changed in the original contract but otherwise leaves it in full force and effect. Contract addendums are tricky to write, because contract law is very clear that all parties […]

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Writing A Good Incident Report

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



Though writing an incident report may seem straightforward, it isn't as easy to craft a logical, helpful report as it seems. These highly detailed reports can have long reaching effects on an organization and how it operates. Accordingly, it's important to have thorough knowledge of how to write a good incident report. Just the Facts […]

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Writing A Legal Complaint In A Personal Injury Lawsuit

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If you have been injured due to the negligence of another, you will need to file a lawsuit against that party for compensation. You must provide both the facts and legal reason for why you should be compensated for your injury. Here is how to write a legal complaint in a personal injury lawsuit. Contact […]

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Writing a Letter to the Judge Before Sentencing

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



If you are a defendant in a trial, you may want to write a letter to the judge before he imposes sentencing. Always consult with your attorney before taking any action regarding your case. If your attorney agrees that writing a letter to the judge will help your case, have the attorney submit the letter […]

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Writing A Residential Rental Lease Termination Letter

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



When a tenant needs to terminate his lease for any number of reasons, it is important that he notify the landlord in due time. Certain basic fundamental guidelines must be followed for this legal document. Here are tips on writing a Residential Rental Lease Termination Letter. Rental Lease Agreement Dates When you are ending your […]

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Writing An Employee Handbook: 10 Essential Things To Include

Written by Christi Hayes and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



An employee handbook provides you with an ideal method of introducing new employees to your organization. It also offers gives all employees a place to find answers to questions about what the organization expects from them and what they should expect from the organization. Because a handbook can have legal implications in the event of […]

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Writing an viction letter

Written by J. Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



Writing an eviction letter can be a tough duty of a landlord who is giving a tenant plenty of time to follow the rules, like paying their rent on time. Each state has its own specific regulations regarding the eviction letter. Here are some of the parameters regarding the general eviction letter. "The Eviction Demand […]

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Writing Off or "Charging Off" Your Second Mortgage & Putting it into Bankruptcy

Written by Aurora F. and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



Every expert says the same thing. A “charge off” is the same as a “write off” and is merely an accounting term used in financial processes. The term is used when a financial institution takes an account from a ledger and posts it to that financial company’s “unable to collect” ledger. The lien from the […]

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Yearly Income of a Bankruptcy Attorney

Written by James Hirby and Fact Checked by The Law Dictionary Staff  



A person’s income usually has several components: salary or charged fee compensation, bonus, commission, profit sharing, and other various benefits.   One salary site stated the average salary nationwide is $61,000.  Experts stated that an attorney will charge from $100 to $300 for a fairly simple bankruptcy filing.  Criteria that make significant differences are the jurisdictions […]

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